The impact of smoking in your area

The information in this scorecard relates to the Unitary Authority of
Disclaimer: The smoking facts and figures scorecard has been produced by and funded by Pfizer, using data that is available and accessible in the public domain. Accurate at time of production. July 2020.

Creating a Smokefree Generation

Helping smokers to quit is the job of the whole health and care system

We want to see local areas developing their own tobacco control strategies, based on NICE evidence-based guidance

Our vision is nothing less than to create a smokefree generation

Smoking hand

Towards a Smokefree Generation: A Tobacco Control Plan for England.1

Impact of Smoking on

Smoking is a harmful practice, yet thousands of people in the region continue to smoke

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2

Data from 2018 indicates that 2 of adults were smokers. This represents approximately people.2,3,*

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Were routine and manual workers 2,†

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Had severe mental illness4

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People in died from potentially preventable smoking-related diseases between 2016 and 20185

smokers have long-term conditions6‡

People who smoke are more likely to have flare ups in their condition and more likely to be admitted to hospital7

Smoking also represents a major financial burden to

ashtray

Up to £

The estimated wider societal cost of smoking to 8,§

£

The amount spent in in 2016 on social care as a result of smoking for adults aged 50 and over

£

was due to approximately hospital admissions for smoking-related conditions in 2014/15

£

The annual smoking-associated cost to the local NHS in 8,§

The number of hospital admissions for smoking-related illness in during 2018-199

£

The cost of treating smoking-related illness via primary and ambulatory services 8,§

Opportunities to reduce the burden of smoking in

Savings

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence estimates that for every £1 invested in quit smoking services, £2.37 will be saved on treating smoking related diseases and lost productivity11

The number of smokers in that would have to quit to achieve this ambition1,2,3,*

Four times as likely to quit

Smokers who use stop smoking services are up to four times as likely to quit successfully as those who choose to quit without help1

60% of smokers

come into contact with their GP once a year.12 Each encounter represents a potential opportunity to offer brief advice to smokers on quitting.

12%

There is an ambition for a 12% national smoking prevalence rate by 20221

There is an ambition for a 12% national smoking prevalence rate by 20221, which this area has already achieved.
Now aim for a 5% smoking prevalence rate by 2030.

Up to £

The estimated financial savings that could be made in from such a reduction1,2,3,8,††

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Local Investment in Stop Smoking Services

Providing support to help smokers quit is highly cost-effective and local stop smoking services continue to offer smokers the best chance of quitting1

NICE guidance recommends that stop smoking services should aim to support at least 5% of the estimated local population of people who are tobacco dependent each year.12 At present,  supports  of its smoking population. 2,3,13‡‡

The section below outlines the investment required for to support 5% of smokers and the level of investment in stop smoking services since 2016.

Figures on required future investment is based on data for the local smoking prevalence rate for 2018 (Annual Population Survey) and the cost of services in 2018/19. 2,13

Local Facts

1,346

Smokers in made a quit attempt through their local stop smoking service in 2018/1913

£

Was invested in 2018/19 on smoking cessation (total expenditure excluding pharmacotherapies)13

smokers

5% of the smoking population in 2,3 §§

Location smoking icon

NHS Digital data demonstrates that disinvestment in stop smoking services tends to correlate with a decline in the number of quit attempts

2016/172,3,14

smokers supported

smokers supported

Total expenditure^:

£

2017/182,3,15

smokers supported

smokers supported

Total expenditure^:

£

2018/192,3,13

smokers supported

smokers supported

Total expenditure^:

£

Required expenditure to support 5% of the local smoking population in 

5%

smokers supported

smokers supported

Total expenditure^:

£

Hands scissors

Total expenditure excluding pharmacotherapy

  • *This figure was calculated by multiplying the adult smoking prevalence percentage from the Annual Population Survey by the total population over 18 from the ONS population estimates for the corresponding year.
  • † Figure relates to APS data for 2018. 
  • ‡ Figure relates to data for the period 2018/19. The definition for long-term conditions is taken from QoF Indicator SMOK005:
  • The percentage of patients with any or any combination of the following conditions: CHD, PAD, stroke or TIA, hypertension, diabetes, COPD, CKD, asthma, schizophrenia, bipolar affective disorder or other psychoses who are recorded as current smokers who have a record of an offer of support and treatment within the preceding 12 months. The figure is an estimation based on the CCGs that fall within the local authority boundary. 
  • §Figures relate to data provided by the ASH Ready Reckoner 2019 covering the period from 2014-2018. 
  • ** This figure was calculated by multiplying the ONS over 18 population estimates for 2018 by 12 (the percentage target for 2022); if target achieved use 5% target prevalence for 2030 and divide the resulting answer by 100. This number was then subtracted from the current number of smokers in the area to calculate the number that would need to quit. 
  • †† This figure was calculated by multiplying the number of smokers that would need to quit to achieve the 5 or 12 per cent prevalence target by the local cost to society per smoker. 
  • ‡‡ This figure was calculated by dividing the number of quit attempts in 2018/19 by the estimated number of adult smokers in the area in 2018. The resulting answer was then multiplied by 100 to give the current percentage of the local smoking population which uses the stop smoking service.
  • §§ This figure was calculated by multiplying the percentage of smokers from the Annual Population Survey by the ONS population estimate and dividing by 100. This number is then multiplied by 5 per cent.
  • ^The percentage of smokers supported was calculated by dividing the number of quit attempts through the service in 2016/17 by the estimated number of smokers in the area in 2016. This number was then multiplied by 100. The number of smokers in the locality in 2016 was calculated by multiplying the adult smoking prevalence in 2016 by the total adult population for the area in 2016. This number was then divided by 100.
  • ^The percentage of smokers supported was calculated by dividing the number of quit attempts through the service in 2017/18 by the estimated number of smokers in the area in 2017. This number was then multiplied by 100. The number of smokers in the locality in 2017 was calculated by multiplying the adult smoking prevalence in 2017 by the total adult population for the area in 2017. This number was then divided by 100.
  • ^The percentage of smokers supported was calculated by dividing the number of quit attempts through the service in 2018/19 by the estimated number of smokers in the area in 2018. This number was then multiplied by 100. The number of smokers in the locality in 2018 was calculated by multiplying the adult smoking prevalence in 2018 by the total adult population for the area in 2018. This number was then divided by 100.
  • N/A = Source data not available

References

  1. Department of Health, 2017. Tobacco Control Plan for England (2017-22). Available: http://bit.ly/2uDYNGe [Accessed: July 2020]
  2. Annual Population Survey (2016 to 2018 data), analysed by Public Health England County and UA in England. Public Health England: Local Tobacco Control Profiles. 2018. Available: https://fingertips.phe.org.uk/profile/tobacco-control/data#page/9/gid/1938132886/pat/6/par/E12000004/ati/202/are/E06000015/iid/92443/age/168/sex/4/cid/4 [Accessed: July 2020]
  3. Office for National Statistics, 2020. Annual Mid-year Population Estimates: Data for 2016-2018. Available: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/populationandmigration/populationestimates/datasets/populationestimatesforukenglandandwalesscotlandandnorthernireland [Accessed: July 2020]
  4. Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC). Statistics on Smoking in England (2015). Local Tobacco Control Profiles. 2016. Available: https://goo.gl/hrwiip [Accessed: July 2020]
  5. ONS Mortality File (2016-18), analysed by Public Health England: Local Tobacco Control Profiles. Available: https://fingertips.phe.org.uk/profile/tobacco-control/data#page/6/gid/1938132887/pat/6/par/E12000007/ati/202/are/E09000002/iid/113/age/202/sex/4/cid/4 [Accessed: July 2020]
  6. NHS Digital, 2019. Quality and Outcomes Framework (2018-19). Available: https://digital.nhs.uk/data-and-information/publications/statistical/quality-and-outcomes-framework-achievement-prevalence-and-exceptions-data/2018-19-pas [Accessed: July 2020]
  7. NHS England. Enhancing the Quality of Life for People Living with Long Term Conditions. Available: http://bit.ly/2hq2hqs [Accessed: July 2020]
  8. Action on Smoking and Health, 2019. ASH Ready Reckoner. Available: https://ash.org.uk/ash-ready-reckoner/ [Accessed: July 2020]
  9. Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC) - Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), analysed by Public Health England. Available: https://fingertips.phe.org.uk/profile/tobacco-control/data#page/9/gid/1938132888/pat/6/par/E12000004/ati/202/are/E06000015/iid/1207/age/202/sex/4/cid/4 [Accessed: July 2020]
  10. Pokhrel, S. Owen, L. Coyle, K. et al. 2016. Costs of disinvesting from stop smoking services: an economic evaluation based on the NICE Tobacco Return on Investment model. Lancet Public Health. Available: http://bit.ly/2yo58Un  [Accessed: July 2020] 
  11. Department of Health and Social Care. Advancing our health: prevention in the 2020s – consultation document. Available: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/advancing-our-health-prevention-in-the-2020s/advancing-our-health-prevention-in-the-2020s-consultation-document  [Accessed: July 2020] 
  12. West R and Fidler J (2011) ‘Key findings from the Smoking Toolkit Study’, STS014. Available at: http://bit.ly/OSS8yt  [Accessed: July 2020]
  13. National Institute of Care and Excellence (NICE), 2018. NICE Guideline 92: Stop smoking interventions and services. Available: https://goo.gl/sFQmvK  [Accessed: July 2020]
  14.  NHS Digital. Statistics on NHS Stop Smoking Services: 2018 to 2019. Available: https://digital.nhs.uk/data-and-information/publications/statistical/statistics-on-nhs-stop-smoking-services-in-england/april-2018-to-march-2019  [Accessed: July 2020]
  15. NHS Digital. Statistics on NHS Stop Smoking Services: 2016 to 2017. Available: https://digital.nhs.uk/data-and-information/publications/statistical/statistics-on-nhs-stop-smoking-services-in-england/statistics-on-nhs-stop-smoking-services-england-april-2016-to-march-2017 [Accessed: July 2020]
  16. NHS Digital. Statistics on NHS Stop Smoking Services: 2017 to 2018. Available https://digital.nhs.uk/data-and-information/publications/statistical/statistics-on-nhs-stop-smoking-services-in-england/april-2017-to-march-2018 [Accessed: July 2020]