Ulcerative colitis

XELJANZ in combination with methotrexate (MTX) is indicated for the treatment of moderate to severe active rheumatoid arthritis in adult patients who have responded inadequately to, or who are intolerant to one or more disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. XELJANZ can be given as monotherapy in case of intolerance to MTX or when treatment with MTX is inappropriate.
XELJANZ in combination with MTX is indicated for the treatment of active psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in adult patients who have had an inadequate response or who have been intolerant to a prior disease modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) therapy.
XELJANZ is also indicated for the treatment of adult patients with moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis (UC) who have had an inadequate response, lost response, or were intolerant to either conventional therapy or a biologic agent.

It's time for an alternative treatment approach in UC

  • Patients with UC wish for a treatment that offers fast and long-lasting relief *†2,3
  • Despite current treatment options, over 70% of patients with moderate or severe UC feel their disease is uncontrolled‡4
    • Approximately 30% of patients do not respond to biologic therapy and around 50% of patients lose their response over time
  • More stringent and consistent endpoints of treatment, such as remission and mucosal healing may lead to better outcomes for patients in the long term1

The unmet need in UC1

  • According to ECCO guidelines, the goal of maintenance therapy in UC is to maintain steroid-free remission6
  • Yet majority of patients with moderately to severely active UC don’t achieve corticosteroid-free remission on current conventional therapies§3
  • The impact of UC is not just physical but also psychological and emotional, with patients experiencing denial, confusion, guilt, depression, anxiety and anger7-9

Watch how XELJANZ can help control UC

 

* Based on survey of 100 UC patients. Currently prescribed therapies included oral 5-ASA medication for 65% of respondents and oral corticosteroids for
10%.2
† Based on survey of 256 UC patients. At the index date, 75.2% of participants were receiving aminosalicylates, 63.2% thiopurines and 23.6% received
corticosteroids.2,3
‡ Survey of 775 UC patients. Current treatments included 5-ASA, corticosteroids, immunosuppressants, and biologic therapy.4
§ Based on survey of 256 UC patients. At the index date, 75.2% of participants were receiving aminosalicylates, 63.2% received thiopurines and 63.6% received
corticosteroids. 12.8% of UC patients achieved corticosteroid-free remission on current conventional therapies.3
5-ASA=5-aminosalicylic acid; UC=ulcerative colitis; ECCO=European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation.

XELJANZ Risk Minimisation Programme (RMP) materials, including a Patient Alert Card, Prescriber Checklists and a Prescriber Brochure are available from https://www.medicines.org.uk/emc/. Patients treated with XELJANZ should be given the Patient Alert Card.

 

1. Dignass A et al. J Crohns Colitis 2012; 6(10): 991–1030
2. Gray JR, Leung E, Scales J. Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2009; 29: 1114–1120
3. Peyrin-Biroulet L et al. Dig Liver Dis 2016; 48(6): 601–607
4. Schreiber S et al. BMC Gastroenterol. 2012; 12: 108
5. Olesson CM et al. Pharmacol and therapeutics 2016; 159: 110-119
6. Harbord M et al. J Crohns Colitis 2017; 11(7): 769–784
7. Devlen J et al. Inflamm Bowel Dis 2014; 20(3): 545–552
8. Sammut J, Scerri J, Xuereb RB. J Clin Nurs 2015; 24(17–18): 2659–2667
9. Rubin DT et al. Dig Dis Sci 2010; 55(4): 1044–1052.