Zinforo Introducing the Patient

Prescribing information is available at the bottom of this page.

Zinforo® Introducing the patient

Discover more about risk factors associated with disease severity, comorbidities and resistance in CAP and cSSTI

 

Risk of mortality in patients with infections increases with older age, the presence of comorbidities, disease severity and delayed initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy/treatment failure5,7,12,17,19,23,28–31

 

Initial treatment choice is key to success in patients with CAP or cSSTI

In CAP patients initial antimicrobial treatment modification occurs in >25% of patients and is frequently the result of insufficient response or treatment failure*32

Comorbidities are associated with higher rates of initial treatment modification32

Initial treatment failure increases patients' risk of mortality in CAP33

In cSSTI patients up to 54% of patients experience initial treatment modification/failure†17,30,31,34
Initial treatment failure increases patients risk of mortality in cSSTI31
Comorbidities are associated with higher rates of initial treatment modification17

 

Initial treatment failure is more common in patients with comorbidities17

Footnotes: *There is no experience with ZINFORO® in the treatment of CAP in the following patient groups: the immunocompromised, patients with severe sepsis/septic shock, severe underlying lung disease, patients with PORT Risk Class V, and/or CAP requiring ventilation, CAP due to MRSA, patients requiring intensive care; the available clinical data cannot substantiate efficacy against PNSP.1
There is no experience with Zinforo® in the treatment of cSSTI in the following patient groups: the immunocompromised; patients with severe sepsis/septic shock, necrotisingfasciitis
, perirectal abscess and patients with third-degree and extensive burns. There is limited experience in treating patients with diabetic foot infections. Caution is advised when treating such patients.1

Abbreviations: CAP, community-acquired pneumonia; COPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; cSSTI, complicated skin and soft tissue infections; CURB-65, Confusion, blood Urea, Respiratory rate, Blood pressure, age >65; ICU, intensive care unit; MRSA, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus; PNSP, penicillin non-susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae; PORT, Pneumonia Patient Outcomes Research Team; PVD, peripheral vascular disease.
References: 1. ZINFORO®. Summary of Product Characteristics; 2. Horita N, et al. Sci Rep 2015;5:14061; 3. Prina E, Ranzani OT, Torres A. Lancet 2015;386:1097–108; 4. Ramani A, Udeani G, Evans J, et al. J Chemother 2014;26:229–34; 5. Welte T, Torres A, Nathwani D. Thorax 2012;67:71–9; 6. File TM, Low DE, Eckburg PB, et al. Clin Infect Dis 2010;51:1395–405; 7. British Thoracic Society Community Acquired Pneumonia in Adults Guideline Group. Thorax 2009;64(
SupplIII):iii1–iii55; 8. Eckmann C, Dryden M. Eur J Med Res 2010;15:554–63; 9. Marwick C, et al. J Antimicrob Chemother 2011;66:387–97; 10. Cooke FJ, Brown NM. Br Med Bull 2010;94:215–27; 11. Mannino DM, Davis KJ, Kiri VA. Respir Med 2009;103:224–9; 12. Udeani G, et al. Hosp Prac 2014;42:109–15; 13. Luna CM, et al. Ann Am Thorac Soc 2016;13:1519–26; 14. Rajan S. Cleve ClinJ Med 2012;79:57–66; 15. Corey GR, et al. J Antimicrob Chemother 2010;65(Suppl4):iv41–iv51; 16. Amara S, et al. CurrMed Res Opin 2013;29:869–77; 17. Garau J, et al. Clin Microbiol Infect 2013;19:E377–E385; 18. Evans JD, et al. Postgrad Med 2014;126:128–34; 19. Dryden M, et al. Clin Microbiol Infect 2015;21:S27–S32; 20. Dryden M, et al. J Antimicrob Chemother 2016;71:3575–84; 21. Garcia-Vidal C, et al. Clin Microbiol Infect 2009;15:1033–8; 22. Alberti S, et al. Clin Infect Dis 2012;54:470–8; 23. Caballero J, Rello J. Ann Intensive Care 2011;1:48; 24. Dryden M, et al. J Antimicrob Chemother 2010;65(Suppl3):iii35–iii44; 25. Poulakou G, et al. Curr Opin Infect Dis 2017;30:158–71; 26. Mpenge MA, MacGowan AP. Ther Clin Risk Manag 2015;11:565–79; 27. Augustine S, Bonomo R. Eur J Microbiol Immunol 2011;3:190–7; 28. Stupka J E, et al. Aging Health 2009;5:763–74; 29. Kothe H, et al. Eur Respir J 2008;32:139–46; 30. Garau J, et al. BMC Infect Dis 2015;15:78; 31. Edelsberg J, et al. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2008;29:160–9; 32. Blasi F, et al. Resp Res 2013;14:44; 33. Menéndez R, et al. Thorax 2004;59:960–5; 34. Cogo A, et al. Infect Dis Ther 2015;4:273–82.

 

Prescribing Information

Zinforo® 600 mg powder for concentrate for solution for infusion: SPC
Legal category: POM
Basic NHS cost: 10 vial pack £375.00

PP-ZFO-GBR-0108. March 2020

Zinforo® CAP Patient profiles

George a 70-year-old nursing home resident presented with fever, cough and sputum production

Severity

  • PORT score IV (severe)
    • 70-year-old male
    • RR >30/min
    • Temperature >40°C
    • Nursing home resident

History/comorbidities

  • History of smoking

Risk factors for difficult-to-treat infection

  • Age >65 years
  • Recurrent infection (hospitalised for pneumonia 3 months ago)
  • Previous antibiotic use

 

Marco presented with fever, cough and pleuritic chest pain and there has been no improvement with ceftriaxone

Severity

  • PORT score IV (severe)
    • 78-year-old male
    • Chronic renal disease
    • Pulse >125 bpm
    • RR >30/min
    • No clinical improvement within 72 hours of ceftriaxone initiation

History/comorbidities

  • Renal insufficiency 
  • Recent alcoholism

Risk factors for difficult-to-treat infection

  • Age >65 years
  • Medical comorbidities
  • Alcoholism

 

Marie presented with fever, dyspnoea and cough

Severity

  • PORT score III (moderate)
    • 56-year-old female
    • PO2<90% (upon admission)
    • Glucose >250
    • Increasing oxygen requirements to maintain oxygen saturation
  • May require move to ICU in next 24 hours*

History/comorbidities

  • Asthma
  • Diabetes

Risk factors for difficult-to-treat infection

  • Recent antibiotic exposure for URTI within previous 3 months

Please note: The examples described here are not actual patients, but fictitious representations of scenarios for which Zinforo® could be considered.
*There is no experience with ceftaroline fosamil in the treatment of CAP in patients requiring intensive care: caution is advised1
Abbreviations: CAP, community-acquired pneumonia; ICU, intensive care unit; PORT, Pneumonia Patient Outcomes Research Team; RR, respiratory rate; URTI, upper respiratory tract infection.
Reference: 1. Zinforo® Summary of Product Characteristics.
 

Prescribing Information

Zinforo® 600 mg powder for concentrate for solution for infusion: SPC
Legal category: POM
Basic NHS cost: 10 vial pack £375.00

PP-ZFO-GBR-0108. March 2020

Zinforo® cSSTI Patient profiles

Laura, 71-year-old diabetic with cellulitis, presented with tender erythematous, non-raised lesions 

Severity

  • Deep and extensive cellulitis on the right leg that extends mid-calf to the ankle (~275 cm2)
  • Signs of systemic inflammatory response
    • Temp >38°C
  • Rapid spread of erythema over past 24 hours

History/comorbidities

  • History of smoking
  • Type 2 insulin-dependent diabetes HbA1c= 7.4%

Risk factors for difficult-to-treat infection

  • Nursing home resident
  • Poorly managed diabetes

 

Martin, 44-year-old readmitted to hospital following inguinal hernia repair with purulent drainage from incision and localised pain

Severity

  • Signs of systemic inflammatory response
    • Temp >38°C
    • Heart rate >90 bpm

History/comorbidities

  • History of depression (currently controlled by medication)
  • Obese
    • Weight = 132 kg
    •  BMI = 37

Risk factors for difficult-to-treat infection

  • MRSA colonisation identified during admission screening for surgery

 

Mark, 67-year-old admitted to Accident and Emergency with a painful and fluctuant gluteal abscess

Severity

  • Abscess area 12 cmwith 95 cmsurrounding cellulitis
  • Rapidly spreading infection
  • Signs of systemic inflammatory response
    • Temp >38°C
    •  Heart rate >90 bpm
    •  RR >20/min
  • May require move to ICU in the next 24 hours

History/comorbidities

  • Chronic renal impairment
    • CrCI at hospital admission = 17 mL/min

Risk factors for difficult-to-treat infection

  • Chronic renal disease
  • Treatment with fluoroquinolone within 6 months for UTI

Please note: The examples described here are not actual patients, but fictitious representations of scenarios for which Zinforo® could be considered.
Abbreviations:  BMI, body mass index; CrCl, creatinine clearance; cSSTI, complicated skin and soft tissue infections; DM, diabetes mellitus; HbA1c, hemoglobin A1c; ICU, intensive care unit; MRSA, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus; RR, respiratory rate; UTI, urinary tract infection.
Reference: 1. Zinforo® Summary of Product Characteristics.

 

Prescribing Information

Zinforo® 600 mg powder for concentrate for solution for infusion: SPC
Legal category: POM
Basic NHS cost: 10 vial pack £375.00

PP-ZFO-GBR-0108. March 2020