This site contains promotional information intended only for healthcare professionals resident in the United Kingdom

Visit Pfizer Medical site
Search

Menu

Close

Sign In or RegisterLog Out
Pfizer MedicinesTherapy AreasExplore ContentEventsVideosMaterialsFeatured ArticlesLet’s ConnectSupplyOff-contract claimsAlliance Healthcare

Example content

Menu

Close

HomeUncontrolled UCWhy Patients SettlePrevalence & ImpactDisease NavigatorResources
Identifying the unspoken realities behind uncontrolled ulcerative colitis (UC) Let’s break it down: Who is affected by UC?UC around the world: how common is it?
  • The prevalence of UC is estimated to be 5 million cases worldwide, and the number of incidences continues to increase2
  • UC is more common in industrialised and westernised countries3,4
  • The highest rates of UC are found in North America and Northern Europe5
  • In the UK alone, at least 1 in every 227 people is diagnosed with UC6
What age does UC usually occur?
  • UC can occur at any age, but it more often shows up in younger people7
  • The two main timepoints where most people get diagnosed are:5
    – 15–30 years old (the majority)
    – 50–70 years old (a smaller group)
Is UC more common in men or women?
  • Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affects men and women equally, but some studies show that UC may be more common in men7,8
Uncontrolled UC may have a negative impact on patients’ daily lives. *Based on the results of the Ulcerative Colitis Narrative global patient and doctor surveys, which aimed to identify the impact of UC and comparing and contrasting perceptions of UC burden and management approaches. Surveys of patients with UC (self-reported diagnosis; N=2,100) and doctors (N=1,254) were completed across 10 countries between August 2017 and February 2018.9
†Missing a mean of 7.3 working days (standard deviation, 16.6) because of UC symptoms.9
‡Patients were considered in remission if they showed a partial Mayo score ≤2, with no subscore >1.10
§Based on results from a cross-sectional study conducted from March 2019 to March 2020 at the U.O. of Pathophysiology of the Digestive System of the University Magna Graecia of Catanzaro (Catanzaro, Italy), in which patients with IBD (202 patients [29% with Crohn’s disease (CD); 71% with UC]) in clinical remission were enrolled in order to assess their perceptions and unmet needs related to their health-related quality of life.10
UC can impact many aspects of a patient’s life. The intimate & personal nature of UC and embarrassment patients may sometimes feel around the condition can make it difficult for them to share the full impact of their disease with their healthcare professionals. Even when patients are comfortable sharing their experience with UC, some may grow accustomed to limiting their quality of life because of their condition. This can make it hard for healthcare professionals to identify when their UC is no longer controlled.Can you identify the unspoken realities in these patient experiences? Read the cards below to discover the unspoken realities, which, if shared, may have indicated that these patients have uncontrolled UC.JÚLIA

“My UC is fine, honestly. I don't really go to the toilet much more than normal. Maybe 2–4 times a day total? I try to keep it to less than that as I'm too busy with work. I love my job, and my media clients; we had 3 workshops with them last week and we’re gearing up for a really intense period. So, of course I’m run down at the end of the day, but who isn’t? No one said having a chronic disease was easy! Of course you have to make compromises.”

Recently, Júlia has had a recurrence of some UC symptoms (abdominal pain; diarrhoea), which have worried her that she may have to step away from client work – work she really values. To manage this, she has started fasting11 and avoiding certain foods and social situations involving food in an attempt to reduce her number of daily stools. This has led to fatigue and light-headedness during the working day.  



Can you think of a patient like Júlia, whose resilience is impacting their quality of life?
 

View more information about Júlia hereLoading
AMADOU

Initially prescribed oral 5-ASAs. Corticosteroids (CSs) were added after a series of flares, but Amadou became CS dependent. He continued with oral 5-ASAs, and azathioprine was added to wean off CSs. He achieved clinical remission, but requested to be taken off azathioprine after ~3 years because, similar to when he was CS dependent, he experienced repeated infections. Amadou then continued with oral 5-ASAs, with topical 5-ASAs being prescribed ~1 year ago to treat persistent symptoms. He is currently not prescribed with CSs.


“I’m a bit tired and stressed out, but otherwise good. Thanks for recommending the patient organisation. Their website is very insightful and convinced me that I'm on the right treatment. I’m doing OK on my new meds. Football? No, I had to quit the team unfortunately, I’ve had a busy period at work, and I was finding it hard to keep up with the demands of both work and football.”

Amadou has not disclosed to his doctor that he is still experiencing abdominal pain on his current treatment. He is highly health literate and is aware this means he will likely require advanced therapy, but he has downplayed his symptoms because of his safety concerns. Amadou is highly stressed because of his situation. The persistent symptoms are affecting his social life, causing him to quit the football team he was captain of, something he took great pride in.


What questions would you ask to better understand a patient's experience with UC?
 

View more information about Amadou hereLoading
MARKUS

A lot has happened since we last spoke. I’ve sadly left the band. I can’t keep up with the live shows these days. Instead, I’ve started music lessons from home. It’s definitely a step down from the stage, but working from home is a better fit for me these days. My UC is OK, I think. I’ve had no bleeding since we started the steroid foam. It would be nice to know a bit more about my type of UC – isolated proctitis, I think it’s called?” 

Live music has become increasingly difficult for Markus. Having to apply the topical foam backstage before a gig was neither convenient nor a pleasant experience. What’s more, he started to experience troublesome symptoms more frequently. Markus is embarrassed to talk about it, but he has experienced accidents at work during gigs due to sudden onset of bowel urgency. This has negatively impacted his ability to work, because he always needs to know where the nearest toilet is. Despite his passion for live music, he felt he could only function fully within the comfort of his own home, so he quit the band and started teaching music from home instead. 



Do you know any patients with UC who have shaped their life around their disease?
 

View more information about Markus hereLoading
Explore reasons why patients with UC might settle for "OK" Why patients settle LoadingReferences:Rapport F et al. BMC Gastroenterol 2019;19(1):166.Berre CL et al. Lancet 2023;402(10401):571-584. Barreiro-de Acosta M et al. J Crohns Colitis 2011;5(6):566-569.Cui G et al. Front Med (Lausanne) 2021;8:8752025.Lynch WD and Hsu R. Ulcerative Colitis. StatPearls Publishing LLC 2023.Crohn's & Colitis UK. Ulcerative Colitis Your Guide. https://crohnsandcolitis.org.uk/info-support/information-about-crohns-and-colitis/all-information-about-crohns-and-colitis/understanding-crohns-and-colitis/ulcerative-colitis [Accessed November 2023].da Silva BC et al. World J Gastroenterol 2014;20(28):9458-9467. Rosenblatt E and Kane S. Gastroenterol Hepatol (NY) 2015;11(9):592-601. Dubinsky MC et al. lnflamm Bowel Dis 2021;27:1747-1755. Larussa T et al. J Clin Med 2020;9:2416-2430. Bonsack O et al. United European Gastroenterol J 2023;11:361-1370.
Prevalence & impact

The prevalence and impact of uncontrolled UC

Learn more Loading
Resources

Resources to help look behind “OK” for patients’ UC

Learn more Loading
References:Rapport F et al. BMC Gastroenterol 2019;19(1):166.Berre CL et al. Lancet 2023;402(10401):571-584. Barreiro-de Acosta M et al. J Crohns Colitis 2011;5(6):566-569.Cui G et al. Front Med (Lausanne) 2021;8:8752025.Lynch WD and Hsu R. Ulcerative Colitis. StatPearls Publishing LLC 2023.Crohn's & Colitis UK. Ulcerative Colitis Your Guide. https://crohnsandcolitis.org.uk/info-support/information-about-crohns-and-colitis/all-information-about-crohns-and-colitis/understanding-crohns-and-colitis/ulcerative-colitis [Accessed November 2023].da Silva BC et al. World J Gastroenterol 2014;20(28):9458-9467. Rosenblatt E and Kane S. Gastroenterol Hepatol (NY) 2015;11(9):592-601. Dubinsky MC et al. lnflamm Bowel Dis 2021;27:1747-1755. Larussa T et al. J Clin Med 2020;9:2416-2430. Bonsack O et al. United European Gastroenterol J 2023;11:361-1370.

Xeljanz®(tofacitinib citrate) Prescribing information and Inflectra®(infliximab) Prescribing information.

  

PP-UNP-GBR-7062 February 2024

Adverse events should be reported. Reporting forms and information can be found at www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard or search 

for MHRA Yellow Card in Google Play or Apple App Store

 

Adverse events should also be reported to Pfizer Medical Information on 01304 616161

PfizerPro Account

To access further materials, resources and receive communication about medicines and vaccines promoted by Pfizer.

Sign In or RegisterAccountSign Out

This site is intended only for healthcare professionals resident in the United Kingdom. If you are a member of the public wishing to access information on a specific medicine, please visit www.medicines.org.uk/emc

 

This website is brought to you by Pfizer Limited, a company registered in England 

and Wales under No. 526209 with its registered office at Ramsgate Road, Sandwich, Kent, CT13 9NJ

 

Copyright © 2024 Pfizer Limited. All rights reserved.

 

VAT registration number GB201048427

PP-UNP-GBR-7866. January 2024
For UK Healthcare Professionals*

These pages are not intended for patients or for members of the general public. The healthcare professional web pages contain promotional content.

I confirm that I am a healthcare professional* resident in the United Kingdom.

If you select 'No', you will be redirected to Pfizer.co.uk where you will be able to access reference information on Pfizer's prescription medicines.

*The ABPI Code definition for healthcare professional is members of the medical, dental, pharmacy and nursing professionals and any other persons who in the course of their professional activities may administer, prescribe, purchase, recommend or supply a medicine.

PP-UNP-GBR-7812. January 2024

YesNo
You are now leaving PfizerPro​​​​​

​​​​​​​You are now leaving www.pfizerpro.co.uk. Links to external websites are provided as a resource to the viewer. This website is neither owned or controlled by Pfizer Ltd. 

Pfizer accepts no responsibility for the content or services of the linked site.​​​​​​​​​​​​​​

​​​​​​​PP-PFE-GBR-3858. November 2021​​​​​​​
​​​​​​​
You are now leaving PfizerPro
​​​​​​​
​​​​​​​You are now leaving www.pfizerpro.co.uk. Links to external websites are provided as a resource to the viewer. This website is neither owned nor controlled by Pfizer Ltd. 

Pfizer accepts no responsibility for the content or services of the linked site other than the information or other materials relating to ​​​​​Pfizer medicines or 
business which it has provided or reviewed.

PP-PFE-GBR-3859. November 2021
​​​​​​​